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Tag: booktalks

Reflection on Final Unit Project

boy-reading

It happens every February and March.  The calendar keeps creeping along.  Lesson ideas keep piling up.  Yearly SBAC and MSP testing is getting closer and closer.  And yet, we’re tasked with cramming as much content as we can into short weeks.  And don’t forget to make it engaging.  And so, I tried, and continue to try…

Each morning at my school, a fourth or fifth grade student presents the morning announcements via our building intercom system.  The contents vary slightly daily, but typically include:  “Good morning” recited in another language; the lunch menu, any pertinent school announcements, a Washington state fact, a history fact for the day, and closing with a book talk.  My goal is to work with a group of fifth grade students to explore ways of integrating technology into the AM announcement process and to increase student engagement, especially in regards to the daily book talk process.  This project is intended to demonstrate an understanding and application of technology integration into the planning and implementation of a classroom activity or lesson.  I will be utilizing the framework of the ASSURE Model:

ASSURE 1

Here’s a link to the full .pdf file of my unit plan and revisions:  Individual Project Haney

To be honest, the formality of the ASSURE model was a struggle for me early on in the process.  While it did force me to consider and reconsider and continuously revise my goals, the reality is I felt hamstrung with constantly trying to make sure I had forgotten anything.  The more time I spent following this ASSURE format, though, the more I realized that much of what I naturally do in my typical lesson planning already follows these steps.  Time is consistently the biggest hurdle to overcome.  As a specialist on a fixed schedule, my weekly time with each class is painfully short.  Add to the mix: holidays, field trips, assemblies, NCCE conferences, a guys’ weekend at a convent for one of my partner teachers (I can’t make this stuff up!)…  Put it all together and it quickly becomes apparent that lessons and skills can’t be introduced and mastered during the students’ library time alone.  That has been my biggest challenge during the quarter, and indeed, during the past few years of teaching.

So how to respond?  Blended learning is a promising next step in my library/classroom’s instructional model.  The idea of creating videos that students can watch independently on-demand, thereby freeing me to work with other groups at the same time.  There’s only one of me, but a blended lesson is about as close as I can come to cloning myself (it’s a bit unnerving to look around and see a video of yourself playing on all of the student’s Chromebooks!).  I’m excited to see where this leads, especially as troubleshooting becomes less necessary.  The kids cannot wait to start trying out web conferencing with Google Hangouts!

My first attempt at an on-demand lesson video for my students:
hangout1

In many ways, my planned unit has been an utterly incomplete failure, and yet, I don’t think I’ve seen the students more engaged or enthused in quite some time.  But I’m not giving up.  Thanks to one of my fifth grade students, I know that when things seem bleak…student 1

Getting Creative With Booktalks

creativity_1ISTE Student Standard 1: Creativity and Innovation
Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology.

Much of my work in the first months of 2016 has been focused on exploring ISTE’s first standard for students and how that should look in an elementary library.  I celebrate the value of creativity every day: when I share stories books with my students; when I introduce them to the work of amazing artists and authors; when I encourage them to think creatively in their search for answers.  But as I have reflected these past weeks, I’ve been reminded of how much more I need to allow for creativity in student work.  

For the past several years our school has followed a morning routine during announcements over the intercom loudspeakers. It is very scripted, and in the past couple of years, most mornings it has also included a student book review. I love that the students are reading and sharing their responses, but I’m hoping to find ways for them to share that aren’t as formulaic and are more memorable. I’m also hoping to involve more 5th graders — there has been little interest on their part with the project as it’s been presented in the past.

Guiding Question:
Using technology, how can fifth grade students create memorable and meaningful book reviews in response to reading and how can these products be shared with a wider audience?

So the question became, what technology could I introduce to the students that would effectively introduce more creativity into the booktalk process?  My goal was guided by Dr. Ruben Puentedura’s SAMR model.  Augmentation, where tech acts as a direct tool substitute with functional improvement — I really like the book talk process we’ve started and feel like technology could ramp up the fifth graders’ efforts (Puentedura & SAMR).  

With that in mind, I dove in. I read journal articles. I scoured websites. I scrolled through endless pages of Twitter tweets (feel free to follow me: @JustinHaney509).  A deep wade through a plethora (yes, I would definitely say it was a plethora) of outdated and inactive links did finally yield results when I discovered the work of an amazing team of librarians and technology specialists in the School District of West De Pere in De Pere, Wisconsin.  Their “Book Talks on Air” project and their yearly “Read Across America” project are exactly what I had in mind, though I didn’t know it at the time!  

The next afternoon, about twenty minutes before the final bell, and with no warning for the fifth grade teacher or his students, we dove in.  A student volunteered to give an impromptu book talk using a couple of our Chromebooks and Google Hangouts. Within the next five minutes, the fifth grade students had spent more time than they had all year on book talks, both as participants and as an attentive audience!  

tech_1tech_2

Next Steps

Now that I’ve found a tool that I think will work for sharing students’ work and now that it’s already proven effective in energizing students for the project, I want to explore the book talk process we have in place (written book talk form, with blanks to fill-in, 5-star rating scale) and open up more opportunities for injecting creativity into student products.  P21, or Partnership for 21st Century Learning, highlight the vitalness of creativity and divergence in student learning throughout their student learning framework. Puccio and Figliotti write: “Divergent thinking occurs when we apply the gas pedal to our thinking process and generate lots of options in response to a particular challenge (without taking the time to evaluate them). We race our engine, producing many, varied and original options.” (Puccio & Figliotti, 2014)

I know I am not providing enough opportunities for creativity in my classroom assignments. The ISTE and P21 standards are clear and well-founded in research. So why have I held back on letting go of control? The reasons are many, and the realities can’t be ignored.  As a teacher-librarian, I only see each class once a week, and that’s assuming there are no holidays/field trips/district trainings/etc.  There’s a lot of curriculum to squeeze into the year, and it’s easy for more open-ended projects to quickly extend from weeks into months. And there’s a library system to run and books to shelve…  But the reality is, if we want our students to more fully engage in their learning, it’s time to get creative. Quietly. But not too quietly.

Resources

Hemlock Creek Elementary School Library. (n.d.). Book Talks on Air – Hemlock Creek Library. Retrieved February 7, 2016, from https://sites.google.com/a/wdpsd.com/hc-library/events/book-talks-on-air

International Society for Technology in Education. (n.d.). ISTE Standards for Students. Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/standards/ISTE-standards/standards-for-students

Puccio, G. J., & Figliotti, J. (2014, April 21). How to foster creativity in the 21st century classroom? – P21. Retrieved from http://www.p21.org/news-events/p21blog/1398-how-to-foster-creativity-in-the-21st-century-classroom

Puentedura, R. (2014, September 24). SAMR and Bloom’s Taxonomy: Assembling the puzzle. Retrieved from https://www.graphite.org/blog/samr-and-blooms-taxonomy-assembling-the-puzzle

Images

Creativity in Progress by Amanda Hirsch; Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0); https://flic.kr/p/5tLtoq  (original image cropped/edited using pixlr.com)

Photos by Justin Haney

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