boy-reading

It happens every February and March.  The calendar keeps creeping along.  Lesson ideas keep piling up.  Yearly SBAC and MSP testing is getting closer and closer.  And yet, we’re tasked with cramming as much content as we can into short weeks.  And don’t forget to make it engaging.  And so, I tried, and continue to try…

Each morning at my school, a fourth or fifth grade student presents the morning announcements via our building intercom system.  The contents vary slightly daily, but typically include:  “Good morning” recited in another language; the lunch menu, any pertinent school announcements, a Washington state fact, a history fact for the day, and closing with a book talk.  My goal is to work with a group of fifth grade students to explore ways of integrating technology into the AM announcement process and to increase student engagement, especially in regards to the daily book talk process.  This project is intended to demonstrate an understanding and application of technology integration into the planning and implementation of a classroom activity or lesson.  I will be utilizing the framework of the ASSURE Model:

ASSURE 1

Here’s a link to the full .pdf file of my unit plan and revisions:  Individual Project Haney

To be honest, the formality of the ASSURE model was a struggle for me early on in the process.  While it did force me to consider and reconsider and continuously revise my goals, the reality is I felt hamstrung with constantly trying to make sure I had forgotten anything.  The more time I spent following this ASSURE format, though, the more I realized that much of what I naturally do in my typical lesson planning already follows these steps.  Time is consistently the biggest hurdle to overcome.  As a specialist on a fixed schedule, my weekly time with each class is painfully short.  Add to the mix: holidays, field trips, assemblies, NCCE conferences, a guys’ weekend at a convent for one of my partner teachers (I can’t make this stuff up!)…  Put it all together and it quickly becomes apparent that lessons and skills can’t be introduced and mastered during the students’ library time alone.  That has been my biggest challenge during the quarter, and indeed, during the past few years of teaching.

So how to respond?  Blended learning is a promising next step in my library/classroom’s instructional model.  The idea of creating videos that students can watch independently on-demand, thereby freeing me to work with other groups at the same time.  There’s only one of me, but a blended lesson is about as close as I can come to cloning myself (it’s a bit unnerving to look around and see a video of yourself playing on all of the student’s Chromebooks!).  I’m excited to see where this leads, especially as troubleshooting becomes less necessary.  The kids cannot wait to start trying out web conferencing with Google Hangouts!

My first attempt at an on-demand lesson video for my students:
hangout1

In many ways, my planned unit has been an utterly incomplete failure, and yet, I don’t think I’ve seen the students more engaged or enthused in quite some time.  But I’m not giving up.  Thanks to one of my fifth grade students, I know that when things seem bleak…student 1